Galaxy XXX Sneak Peek!

Want a sneak peek of Galaxy XXX?

Well, now you can!

Our next Kickstarter project will be launching very soon, but before we do that, we want you—YES YOU!—to get a look at the project.

This is not the complete game—in fact, it’s missing three chapters—but it’s enough to get you started. You can make characters and run the game!

So, click on this link to get your copy of the Galaxy XXX Sneak Peek!

Galaxy XXX: Three Questions

Back in 1999, I met a curious fellow by the name of Jared Sorensen. We met at a game convention, spending a few hours just chatting about games. This is when Jared introduced me to the concept of “the three questions.”

Jared used his questions as a kind of compass to keep himself on track when designing games. It was at that time I started designing what I call my “Little Games.” Games like Cat, Yesterday’s Tomorrow and Wield were games with a single theme, razor focused and rarely over fifty pages long. Jared’s three questions proved very useful. Even when I began design on a Big Game such as Houses of the Blooded, the questions kept me headed in the same direction as when I started. Trust me, it’s easy to get lost in 400+ pages of game design. Very easy.

I have started every new project with the three questions in mind. Except this one. I can’t tell you exactly why but…

I think I got distracted by the boobs.

Galaxy XXX began as an idea tossed around by Jessica Kauspedas and myself in a restaurant called Fuddruckers. (A name that practically begs to be mispronounced and stagger into an overt sexual innuendo.) I stumbled across a couple podcasters saying they wanted to play a game where, “The only resolutions to conflict were epic space battles and sex!” I told Jessica, “I want to design that game.” So, we started talking about it.

The film Barbarella had a profound impact on my youthful libido and when I heard that line, a mostly naked Jane Fonda popped into my head. The film’s absurd nonsense stuck with me and still amuses me to no end. Now, make no mistake, it’s an awful film, but that doesn’t stop me from loving it. I know the whole thing almost line-by-line. But the one thing that struck me about the film is that only one person actually dies in the film (Durand Durand) and it’s not from a gun or a sword or any kind of weapon.

And that got me thinking.

In most RPGs, a ten second fight scene takes four hours of real time to resolve, but seducing the bar maid is just a single roll. (This is where I make the obvious joke: “A game designed by virgins with sword fetishes.”)

Could I design a game that did the opposite? Where fight scenes are completely incidental to the plot and sex is the main resolution mechanic?

This is how Galaxy XXX started. But, it hit a few boobs. I mean, bumps. Stumbling blocks. Aw, you know what I mean.

My main problem? I forgot to ask the three questions.

I got so distracted by the goal, I forgot to lay the groundwork. I started walking without a map. I knew where I wanted to go, but I had no idea how to get there. And it wasn’t until late in the process—when I had a playtest document—that I realized I ended up someplace completely different than where I wanted to be.

So, like the Boy Scouts trained me, I turned around and went back the way I came. I started from scratch. And when I got to the beginning, I asked myself the first question…

What is Your Game About?

Galaxy XXX is about exploring ideas that are different from your normal experience, learning from that exploration, and how important it is to recognize that beyond the superficial differences, we’re all really the same.

As you’ll find out, the 40th Century is filled with alien species with very different ideas than our own. Ideas about violence, sexuality, freedom, heroism and love. But if you look under the surface of these ideas, you’ll discover there are more similarities than differences. Too often, we get distracted by cultural differences. We see foreign customs that seem different. Culture is a mask. If you look under the mask, you’ll always find a human face.

Most roleplaying game fetishize violence. With initiative, speed factors, damage values, bleeding rules, fire damage, acid damage, poison damage… all of this is obsession over details. But if the issue of sex comes up… well, that’s taboo, fella. We don’t talk about sex at this table.

This game is a little different. Keeping with the first question, we want to explore a game that focuses on sex and de-emphasizes violence to the point of triviality. But we also wanted players to have the option of playing characters who were not just aliens from another world, but different in an all-together human way. Thus, we made gender presentation and orientation mechanics in the game. You can choose to make your character a different gender than your own and a different orientation than your own. After all, isn’t one of the things that makes an RPG different from a table top board game is that your playing piece can be different than you?

So, that’s what my game is about: putting players in a safe situation where they can play outside their comfort zones. Explore something different. Trying on someone else’s shoes and walking for a mile. Someone said you should do that. I’m forgetting his name…

Finally, Galaxy XXX is a science fiction game. And part of the genre of science fiction I love the most is this idea: “We’re going to get better. We’re going to solve problems. We’re gonna sort this stuff out.”

The game takes place in the 40th Century and keeping with that theme, mankind has indeed “sorted this stuff out.” We’ve come a long way since the time of constant warfare, bigotry, slavery and greed. Forgive me for getting political for a moment, and it’ll only be for a moment, but right now—right now—in the 21st Century, in the wealthiest country in the world, a significant percentage of our citizens go without food or shelter. In the wealthiest country in the world.

Needless to say, that’s a problem. Fortunately, by the 40th Century, we’ve recognized that’s a problem and we took care of it. We’ve created technology that fixes those problems. We’ve created technology that fixes illness and injury. And we’ve bumped into alien species who have done the same thing. In fact, they got the tech to do so from the same source we did.

More on that later.

But the galaxy still has problems. Yes, we’ve sorted out illness and hunger and poverty, but there are still issues we have to deal with.

That’s where the players come in. They’re going to be playing the roles of people who solve the galaxy’s problems. They’re “voyeurs” who have special authority granted by the intergalactic government. They travel around the stars dealing with pirates and slavers and smugglers and evil people who want to revert the galaxy back to the old ways of doing things.

You see, in Star Wars, the heroes are trying to overthrow evil ideas. In Galaxy XXX, the heroes are protecting good ones.

The galaxy is a great and wonderful place that cares about you. And the players represent that. They are agents of hope. They are good people looking out for others. Not for money or glory or fame. But because when you have super powers, that’s what you do. You help out wherever you can.

When you get the awesome, you gotta share the awesome.

And maybe that’s what Galaxy XXX is about, too.

How Does Your Game Do That?

Designing a roleplaying game is a lot like designing a philosophy. When you design a philosophy, you’re saying, “I think this is how the world works.” Well, when you design an RPG, you’re doing the same thing. Except in an RPG, you aren’t speculating. You actually get to be the person who decides how the world works.

Jessica and I thought about how the setting of Galaxy XXX works and we came to a few conclusions.

Remember the old GI Joe cartoon from the ’80’s? How about The A-Team? You need something more modern? How about the Fast & Furious franchise? Well, all these things have something in common.

Violence is background noise.

The shootout scenes in GI Joe and the A-Team were full of sound and fury but really never amounted to anything. They usually ended when one side ran out of bullets. Nobody got shot, or if they did, it didn’t really matter.

And injury? Hah! I remember watching Furious 7…

… wait a second. I should pause for a moment.

Before I saw Furious 7, I had never seen a Fast & Furious movie before. My first time. When I walked out, it was clear to me this franchise takes place in an alternate universe where white males are not in charge of things, physics don’t work the same, 9/11 never happened, people have actual character classes (the soldier, the clown, the bad ass, etc.), being an officer of the law or a criminal gives you mystical healing and fighting powers, federal governments have no real authority and have to operate clandestinely, and street shamans summon the power inside of magical cars.

I also discovered I may be alone in this interpretation. But Vin Diesel is a gamer, so I’m maintaining my hypothesis.

Okay, digression over.

I remember watching Furious 7 and Dwayne Johnson’s character—who’s been sitting in a hospital for weeks with broken limbs—suddenly decides his injuries don’t matter anymore. He breaks his casts, flexes his muscles and his broken bones suddenly mend with the sound of cracking knuckles. It was at that moment I figured out how to do violence in our game.

Injury and violence are incidental. In fact, players choose when their characters get injured. Not from the result of a roll, but because it makes the story more interesting. And when the injury doesn’t matter anymore… it just goes away.

Violence is incidental. It’s the sex that matters. And it can take a long time to resolve it.

What Behaviors Does Your Game Reward?

Sex.

No, I mean it. We reward you for having lots and lots of sex.

There’s this mechanic called “Sex Energy” that gives you tons of bonus dice. You get Sex Energy by having sex with other people. Well, specifically, you give people Sex Energy by having sex with them. The better the sex, the more Sex Energy you give. So, if you’ve got two people who have amazing chemistry and are great in the sack, they’re going to give each other a ton of Sex Energy. And you want Sex Energy because it gives you bonus dice. Like, a lot of them.

The game also rewards you for being a hero. We’ve got these things called “Hero Points.” The more hero you are, the more Hero Points you get. And you’ll want Hero Points. Trust me.

Of course, if you choose to be an evil bastard, you lose your character. Straight up. She becomes an NPC. Don’t do that.

With Your Consent…

So, with all that in mind, let’s get on with the game. It’s a game about sex and love and blind heroics. A game about seeing yourself in strange faces, a game about looking beyond the superficial to something deeper. And it’s a game about sex. A science fiction game that boldly predicts that we’re going to fix all these problems we have now and finally get along with each other. And, it’s a game about sex. A game about how technology may change us in the future, about the fluidity of gender and how mortality may just be an engineering problem. And, it’s about sex.

By the way, did we mention the sex?

Galaxy XXX: A Tale of Two Covers

“Tynes Law: Make the game you want to play and @#$% everything else.”
— attributed to John Tynes

I live and breathe by that quote above. Doesn’t matter if John actually said it (I’ve asked him; he says he doesn’t remember saying it) because I believe it’s the key to game design. Make the game you want to play and ignore everything else. Yes, other people can provide valuable feedback, but if you start getting lost in the “what will other people think” forest, you are @#$%’d.

When it comes to Galaxy XXX, however, I’m doing a lot more asking for feedback than I usually do. I mean a lot more.

Take for example, our lovely cover illustrated by the amazing Paulius Zakarauskas. In fact, take a look at both of them.

XG_60_01bGalaxy XXX CoverXG_60_01b_low res

The cover on the left is the original. The cover on the right includes changes I asked Paulius to make. It wasn’t easy to ask Pau to make changes after he submitted a final version, but he’s a pro and made the changes I asked for.

Now, the question you might be asking is, “Why did you change the cover, John?”

That, Dear Reader, is a long and complicated answer. But, I’ve got the time and the word count, so let’s do it.

Anson & Vex

The picture features the two main characters from the Galaxy XXX novella I’m writing. We have Captain Andrew Anson and Valeria Vex (you can figure out who is whom). And before we go any further, let me take a moment to explain the difficulty these two gave me.

When writing a story, there’s a difference, I feel, between the narrator and the protagonist. At least, there can be. Usually, the narrator is the protagonist, but not always. In fact, playing with the question of, “Who is the protagonist?” is one of my favorite literary tricks. For example, when watching Fargo, you don’t get introduced to the protagonist until the second act. All the characters you see are the story’s antagonists. Another example I like to use is The Shawshank Redemption. Many feel Andy Dufresne is the protagonist. They’re wrong. Andy is the antagonist. He’s the agent of change. The real protagonist is Red. He’s settled in, given up hope and accepts his lot in life. The antagonist comes along and offers him an opportunity to change. Of course, Red refuses it. It’s a perfect example of something I like to call the “benevolent antagonist.”

When I started writing the story, I felt Anson was really just an observer. He’s a 22nd Century astronaut who got lost in space and awoken from cryosleep in the 40th Century. He’s only around to be the stranger in a strange land, to observe the adventures of my real protagonist, Valeria Vex. But then, something started to happen. As I wrote the characters, Anson took a more active role. As the plot unfolded, I started to realize… my two main characters were both protagonist and antagonist to each other.

Anyway, more on that at another time.

Barbarella & The Fireman

In the fiction, I describe Valeria’s outfit—through the eyes of Anson—as “a skin-tight, silver outfit that would have been called a bikini a few thousand years ago. High, leather boots and black gloves. She carried no weapons that I could see, and trust me, I could see just about everything.”

So, I knew exactly what I wanted for Vex. She wears the outfit because it’s revealing. Because it’s distracting. Because it’s a tactical advantage. And because she’s a henta adept, she wears it because it’s easy to take off.

For Anson’s outfit, I felt giving him a bare chest and pants would be sexually appealing as well. I thought about shorts… but that felt too… I don’t know. It didn’t feel right. Didn’t feel right for the character. He’s brand new to this Century and not fully comfortable yet. So, the shirt off is a step in the right direction for him. Yeah, a baby step. He’s not fully bought in to the mindset of my groovy 40th Century, but he’s getting there. Maybe he’ll never be entirely comfortable with it, and hey!, that’s okay. As one of my early lovers told me, “We only go as far as your comfort level, not mine. Because mine will blow your @#$%’in mind.”

Besides, he looks like a fireman. And that’s what I wanted. I wanted her to be smokin’ hot and I wanted him to be smokin’ hot. He looks like a fireman and she looks like Barbarella.

So, we’ve got Anson in his trousers and Vex in her silver bikini. I’m ready to go. I send the art description to Pau and wait. We go through a few sketches and then he sends me the final. The image you see up above. He blows my mind. I’m amazed. I love it.

I start showing it off. Folks dig it the most, baby.

And then… and then…

Like I said, I’m not deaf to all criticism. I have a small number of people I trust and I give their opinions heavy weight. I was in New Mexico recently and showed the cover to my friend Marissa. When she saw it, she had a reaction I didn’t anticipate.

“Why isn’t she wearing pants?”

I… uh… had… I mean… she… um…

“He’s wearing pants, right? Why can’t she wear pants?”

Yeah… see… it’s a…

“You don’t think skin tight pants are sexy?”

Jessica was there, heard Marissa’s critique and agreed. Vociferously.

And there, right there, I realized my mistake.

All my professional game design life I’ve been fighting against cheesecake art in RPGs. And here I am, making a game that actually gives me a valid reason to have cheesecake art. And beefcake art, too. And I @#$%ed it up.

They made a fair point. I wanted a cover that portrayed both my characters as both action heroes and sex symbols. Competent, gorgeous, three-dimensional and smokin’ hot. But if I wanted them to be portrayed as equals—which I did—she should be wearing pants. If she wasn’t wearing pants, he shouldn’t be wearing pants.

They were right. Absolutely right.

It wasn’t a matter of making people sex objects. I mean, I was making them sex objects. But three-dimensional sex objects with personalities and flaws and strengths and backgrounds and…

Dammit, she needed pants. Skin tight pants.

So, I contacted Pau and told him my dilemma. As I said, Pau is a professional, so he gave me several options. We agreed on one and he sent the revision.

And now, you see the difference.

And Valeria Vex still looks like Barbarella.

Galaxy XXX

It’s a long story how we got here, but I can tell it. Pay attention and don’t fall behind. I don’t want to explain it twice.

A few thousand years ago, star-faring humans reached the edge of our own galaxy and discovered something incredible: an alien artifact on the dwarf planet, Eris. In fact, it was difficult not to find. It sent up a beacon, all but shouting, “I’m here! I’m here!” When we picked it up, we discovered a message from another species. It said, “Congratulations on making it this far. If you’re ready, maybe you’re willing to go a little further.”

The beacon also contained cryptic solutions to problems humanity had suffered for generations. We still had to figure it out for ourselves, but whoever left it for us to find wanted to give us a helping hand. But questions remained: who were these people and where did they go? And why did they want to help us?

After centuries of research, scientists unlocked the artifact’s secrets, providing unprecedented leaps in technology. With the knowledge of this alien race—who called themselves, “zhun”—we unlocked true genetic manipulation, intergalactic travel and other technological and biological marvels.

“Azikawi Drives” (also known as “AZ Drives” or “AZtech Drives,” so named after Chloe Azikawi, the physicist who designed them) gave humanity the ability to travel vast distances in the blink of an eye and within a generation, mankind left its home galaxy behind, searching for the extraterrestrial species who left us that message.

We did not find them, but we found others. And, as it turned out, the other star-faring species discovered the same artifacts containing the same message and the same technology around the same time we did. Some were a little ahead of us, a few were a little behind us, but each discovery coincided with the other.

Almost as if it was supposed to happen that way.

A kind of fellowship developed from the species that discovered zhun tech. It was clear the zhun intended all of us to find it and at approximately the same time.

Then, we discovered other sentient species that had not yet discovered their own zhun outposts. The decision of what to do with led to the establishment of an interspecies council. After a year of debate, we decided we should allow the other species to discover zhun tech at their own pace.

Unfortunately, shortly after the council formed, two hundred years of interstellar warfare broke out, leaving all the species in ruin. Historians now call this period, “the War of Sorrows.” We nearly destroyed ourselves. Thankfully, we got over all that and the War of Sorrows ended with a whimper, not a bang.

With numerous species all connected by a common past, a new technological and anthropological revolution pushed us into an era of intergalactic collective learning. As individual species, each of us grows at a relatively steady rate. However, once we connect with other species that connect with even more, the rate at which all of us learn and grow speeds up. No longer limited by their own imaginations, the collective imagination of all led to vast improvements in discovery, technology and culture.

Now, we live in peace and plenty. But a mystery still remains: where did the zhun go? It’s obvious they went somewhere. And they gave us enough clues that we might someday follow. Some believe the zhun are still with us, existing as creatures of pure energy and mind. Others think they went to another universe, a blind jump of faith that something was out there. Of course, whether or not there was something out there is another point all together.

We don’t know where they went, but we’ll figure it out. In the meantime, the species now all share technology and resources as we all work together. And, until then, we all have Galaxy XXX to keep us entertained.

The Big Bore and Galaxy X

The United Planets now benefit from post-scarcity society. There is no need for war. Nobody goes hungry. Nobody has to sleep in the cold. If you need space for your people to grow, go find another planet, terraform it and make it your new home. You can do that. The technology is available and your government will probably help you out.

As a citizen of the UP, your body is no longer entirely biological. You have hundreds of thousands of nanobots rushing through your system, keeping it safe from sickness and injury. Cut yourself and it heals in an instant. Break a leg and it’s knitted and strong again in just a few minutes.

And if you don’t like your body, you can change it! Not feeling like your gender fits or just looking to mix things up? Choose another one! Change your eyes, your hair, your entire physical appearance in less than an hour.

The biology of a UP citizen has other benefits as well. In 21st Century terms, each citizen is a “hot spot” capable of connecting to the Galactic Net. Because of that connection, each citizen can interface with another—with permission, of course—communicating via a method that less technologically savvy cultures might consider magical telepathy. You can even record thoughts and dreams and send them as direct downloads.

Yes, the people of the United Planets are happy and content. They have everything they could ever want at the touch of their fingers.

And, they’re bored.

And so, two enterprising citizens named Favo Bellon and Lucy Olenkis created a game. An elaborate roleplaying experience for those who sought adventure and excitement. They opened their entertainment in an uninhabited galaxy they called Galaxy X, but quickly had to change the name for copyright reasons, adding two more X’s to the end. The success of their endeavor surprised everyone. UP citizens rushed to Galaxy XXX to play the game. The response overwhelmed the creators, rushing and scrambling to keep up with demand.

Bellon and Olenkis had a hit on their hands.

Over the course of two centuries, the popularity of Galaxy XXX soared. Strategies emerged, faded, evolved and vanished as players engaged in this most complicated form of play. At first, only humans participated in the games, but as they became more popular, alien allies began showing interest. After a few software upgrades—and more than a few failed test runs—Galaxy XXX was ready for alien competitors. The size of the game tripled as a brand new crop of players jumped in.

Olenkis and Bellon’s next step was to stream video of the games to the general public. The public selected teams and followed their adventures from the safety of their homes. Galaxy XXX suddenly became a spectator sport. And that one little change transformed the way teams did everything. With audiences watching, teams became more dramatic, more colorful and more spectacular. Creative teams thrived while less inventive teams faded into obscurity. Schools and private trainers opened their doors, giving citizens the opportunity to hone their skills.

Galaxy XXX had evolved from a live action PVP sport into something else entirely. Creative and inventive teams bent the rules as far as they could go, introducing new technologies into the Galaxy, forcing the creative team to make rulings that would change the way everyone played the game. Galaxy XXX became an intergalactic sensation. But it was only the beginning.

The Henta Enigma

Each species made different discoveries when they unlocked zhuntech. Being individuals, each of us decoded the cryptic technology in our own way. For the species known as the navali—one of the first to unlock the secrets of the zhun—one of those discoveries was the mystical practice of henta.

The navali taught that the zhun gave them henta to bring peace and understanding to all their chosen species. Henta taught that meditation and proper ritual linked a henta adept to a greater power that gave them abilities that seemed magical to other cultures. And what was this “greater power?”

In a word, sex.

The henta adepts could communicate telepathically, restore health and vigor and even perform limited telekinesis.

Scientists rushed to study these “sex masters,” but discovered very little. They concluded the discovery of zhuntech unlocked the powers, but exactly how they worked baffled the researchers.

Many sought to learn the secrets of these sex techniques, but the henta adepts kept their secrets, revealing them only to a few.

And then came Meijemi Viola.

Viola became the first human student at a henta academy. There, she spent five years studying the technique becoming a full-fledged henta adept. And when she left, she brought those skills to Galaxy XXX.

After Viola left the navali, she came to Galaxy XXX and she brought henta with her. Using a combination of the henta technique she learned from the Navali and 40th Century technology, Meijemi Viola created a technique allowing her to sense, summon and control what the Navali called “henta”: sexual energy.

She became an overnight sensation.

Centuries later, henta is still a mysterious technique with many explanations. While Galaxy XXX technology may seem magical to a 21st Century audience, the Art of Henta seems magical to a 40th Century mind.

Some say it is a natural outgrowth of using nanotech and hotwire interfacing, nothing more. The mystery of “the Henta Enigma” is just a clever use of existing technology. “There is no magic here,” scientist and researcher Jacob Ransen wrote. “Henta is a true physical phenomenon. We see it, we can learn it, we can use it. But it is a mistake to ascribe mysticism to mystery. Just because we don’t know how it works doesn’t mean we won’t figure it out someday.”

On the other hand, others believe henta is a meditative technique that allows us to communicate with the vanished Forerunner race. They belive the Forerunners uplifted themselves into beings of pure energy and the use of henta gives us a glimpse of the kind of power they command. “The Forerunners are still with us,” they say, “waiting for us to join them.”

When Viola brought henta to Galaxy XXX, Bellon and Olenkis called for an immediate investigation. During their review, they ran bioscans on both her and her targets. Essentially, she was causing extreme orgasms in her targets.

With all the wetware running in a 44th Century body, a henta-induced orgasm is the most disruptive event a body can endure. Most wetware focused on eliminating pain and discomfort, at least downplaying it, but pleasure was something else entirely. Most citizens used wetware that increased sexual pleasure. Using the wetware against itself, Viola overwhelmed her target’s enhanced biology, turning their own bodies into traps.

As her career continued, Meijemi Viola found new and more spectacular ways of using her “henta powers.” When others wished to learn them, she taught them not only the powers but also the philosophy of henta. Many dismissed both her and her philosophy as a quaint and antiquated religion, but others embraced it. Many followed in her footsteps, sometimes as pale shadows, and other times offering innovation and invention. Meijemi’s celebrity led to a wave of new Galaxy XXX Academies, all teaching the “Henta Technique.” After a few centuries, henta powers have become an integral part of the games. Most audience members could not even imagine the games without them.

Galaxy XXX Rules

Over the centuries, the rules for Galaxy XXX have undergone many changes. The current set of rules can be boiled down to a few key principles.

No Real Weapons

Only weapons sanctioned by GX Rules Team are allowed. These are generally energy weapons, or “stunguns,” that do non-lethal damage. In fact, they don’t do “damage” at all. Instead, the stunguns used in GX do the reverse of damage: they overwhelm your nervous system with pleasure, forcing you into a sweet, delirious state of unconsciousness.

Fisticuffs are right out as well. Players can acquire special gauntlets that deliver the equivalent of a “stun punch.” Same effect as a stungun.

Ships used in GX do not have real weapons, either. Instead, each ship has “hot spots” representing critical systems and weapons designed to disable them. The shots done from ship-to-ship do not actually damage the ship, but temporarily disable the systems. Life-support is not a targetable system, but weapons, communications, artificial gravity and propulsion are.

Points

Galaxy XXX has a Leaderboard that keeps track of both team and individual scores. Because GX is a PVP environment, teams and individuals score points by defeating opposing teams and accomplishing quests put out by the Game Organizers (GOs).

Defeating opposing teams is worth points. So is capturing the team and taking them back to your Safe Zone. But if a team escapes before you can get to the Safe Zone, they gain points. Completing Game Quests also earns players points.

Players use points to purchase additional equipment and upgrade existing equipment.

Players can also earn Achievements that add to their place on the GXXX Leaderboards.

Teams

While there are individuals running around GX3, most players form teams. A team can consist of up to 6 players. Teams can pool points for equipment purchases and generally have a better chance of scoring points in the first place. After all, there’s safety (and advantage) in numbers.

Each team has a “home base” where they store equipment, keep their ships and return objectives. Most capture missions require the team return the captured materials (or persons) to their home base. Also, the home base acts as a safe zone: no attacks on home base.

Injuries and Fatalities

While injuries are inevitable in a PVP action environment, the enhanced biologies of the players allow for quick healing and recovery. Most minor injuries heal in seconds. Even more serious ones—such as a broken bone—can be mended in a few minutes.

If a player is grievously injured, he is considered “Out of Play” and other players should not engage her until she is ready to return.

Fatalities are rare, but they do occur. The point of the games is not to kill enemies, of course, but every once in a while, accidents happen. If a player dies, the game stops. All current actions are cancelled and both teams return to home base.

Non-Uplifted Species

Species who have not discovered forerunner tech are generally not allowed to play GX3. There have been exceptions, but those who do must undergo rigorous medical procedures to bring their biology up to speed.